Patan

Once, an independent and mighty kingdom of the Kathmandu Valley, Patan became a melting pot of two influential religions, Hinduism, and Buddhism. The pious Krishna (Hindu) temple, which rests in the middle of the town; into the very own town, whose entire city’s architecture was dedicated to the philosophy of the Buddhist Dharma-Chakra (Wheel of Righteousness) molds Patan, to this date, as a glorious city of culture, religion, art, and heritage.

Patan is merely 5 km away from the capital city, Kathmandu, but, despite such proximity, its ‘preserved’ ancestral uniqueness distinguishes Patan as a different environment to experience in a short travel. Patan is also known as Lalitpur, “City of Beauty”, and its unique Durbar Squares, temples, alleys, cuisine, hospitality and religious tolerance justify the pre-historic status of the city.

Patan is a city of 55 major temples, 136 Buddhist monasteries, fine metal works, and countless festivals. Patan takes pride in producing great Thanka painters in the country. In every – now and then – corners and alleys of Patan can be seen with Thanka painters, filling color to ancient Gods and Goddess.

Patan, in recent years, has become a favorite spot for Diplomats, INGOs, and NGOs. Perhaps for its peaceful environment, despite being close to the capital city, or just because the city is plain beautiful, in itself, Patan has numerous cafe, pubs, and shops, that offer Buddha’s, exotic, handmade brass sculpture at very reasonable price.

Source: Nepal Tourism Board